25 Jul

Reasons why you don’t always reach your goals

Stopping smoking, losing weight or improving your time management. These are common examples of goals we set ourselves from time to time, with many coincidentally being set with great pomp, ceremony and champagne around about the beginning of the year. New Year’s resolutions we call them. We convince ourselves that change needs to take place as a new year rolls around. A new year, a new me! For some this may be what’s required to get moving and achieve the desired results, but for most these “new goals” fizzle out within the first two weeks of the year and everything goes back to normal with the idea of improving ones time management being a dark and distant memory.

So what went wrong? Firstly, goal setting shouldn’t be controlled by the time of the year. If you want to achieve something start doing it as soon as possible. Stop waiting for the new year, a new moon or the next leap year to make things happen. Waiting causes you to lose momentum and motivation and procrastination starts kicking in. Secondly, setting a goal and just doing it, is not always as straight forward as we think. The secret to achieving a goal is understanding that your habits and behaviours need to change first. As an example, to achieve the goal of improving your time management, stop thinking about being a time management king/queen. Instead, start thinking about the following;

  1. What habits/behaviours are  currently preventing you from achieving this goal?
  • Going to bed too late and waking up late.
  • Saying yes to every request that comes your way
  • Not keeping a consistent diary

2. What habit, from the above list can you change right now?

  • Setting an earlier bed time or setting the alarm to wake up earlier.
  • Before saying yes, check what tasks and priorities are currently needing your attention. Then say yes, if you can manage it or get into the habit of saying no.
  • Start using a diary.

These are simple habit or behaviour changes. It’s about focusing on changing just that one habit and making it a part of your everyday life, making it a norm. Once the habit has been altered for the better you, can move onto the next habit-changing task. Very soon, you will  realise that you are actually achieving your main goal. Successful goal achievement is not about big wins, it is about understanding what habits or behaviours are holding you back, and figuring out the best way to change them.

05 Apr

What comes after success?

What comes after success? What happens after you’ve achieved your first big goal?
The meaning of business success will always be unique for everyone. We are all aiming for different goals with different focuses, which is what makes my job so interesting. But what happens after you have reached your unique success?
Do you have a plan for how to maintain this success or haven’t you thought about this yet?
I believe we spend too much time thinking about the journey to success, the marketing, client acquisition, brand awareness, and not enough time on what happens after that. We tend to focus on the chase, the fun, exciting and sexy tasks in the business and don’t often think about what will be required of us after we’ve built the brand or secured some clients. What comes next? Is the plan to sit around patting yourself on the back, or building a sustainable and successful business?
So whilst you are plotting world domination, think about the following and perhaps plan for these before you conquer the world or at least do this at the same time.
1. Your role: What will your role look like once you have reached your goals? Will you still be working as passionately in the business or could you delegate or outsource certain responsibilities? It’s like climbing a staircase, every time you reach a new step your observation point changes. A new set of goals would need a new focus. Business owners often find themselves “stuck” or stagnating in the same role, often due to lack of direction. I like to call it “ground-hog day syndrome”. This complacent manner is not very healthy for the business owner or business growth, moral and business culture. To prevent this stuck feeling, plan the next step or start thinking about the next step, the next goal now before you even reach your initial goal.
2. Your team: Your people plan – what does that look like? If you’re a one-man band you may decide either to expand, to hire new team members or to stay on your own. Think about your team now (if you have one, or imagine one ). What would the perfect organogram be in your business? Before you can take on a new role you should define your people strategy. Teams also need to be guided, motivated, managed and lead. What is your current skill set around these key characteristics? Start defining your skills needs, and build that into your planning. It’s all about being proactive and being in control of the plan instead of being reactive and spending your precious time putting out fires.
3. Your product/service: These would always be evolving and adapting to your current and future market. In order to be ahead of the game, what is your innovation plan? Whilst working on and delivering the current  product/service offering there should always be an on-going product/service evaluation. What’s going well, what’s needing an update? What are your customers asking for? Looking externally at various issues and how they could affect your offering, such as environmental, political, social, economic, legislative and technological factors.
4. Your processes and systems: Think about the perfect system(s) you could implement into your business. Systems that would streamline your workload, improve your time management, communications and overall help to maintain your business structure. You may not be aware of these systems or even able to afford these systems right now, but could you budget for them and do some best practise research? Always begin with the end in mind, think about what it needs to look like and plan towards that vision.
This is an example of working on your business, not just in your business. Taking the time to future proof your business. Take a look at the following checklist, which can help you identify areas which you would need to focus on to ensure you are building a sustainable business. Future proofing your business checklist
01 Mar

Do things right the first time

Recently I was asked what my best tip or advice would be around time management. How can one run a business and be effective in managing their time?

There is not just one answer, since it depends on where you are in your business, what systems and processes are in place and how many resources you have.

There are the general tips of prioritising your tasks, delegating and building micro-goals into your routine, but the one piece of advice that really stands out for me is the following in the form of an analogy.

In order to build a strong house, which will withstand all weather conditions you naturally begin by building a strong foundation. Once the foundation has been built you then start with the framework and from there you fill in the detail. I’m no builder, but even to me it makes sense. Building a strong foundation and then moving systematically through and completing one project after the other, makes for good building sense.

So, relating this to business, if you want to spend your time wisely and make sure your business can withstand all “weather conditions”, make sure you have a strong foundation in the business. This would include having the right people in your business, the correct systems and processes, defining an accurate target market and being clear on your product or service offering. Spend time in the very beginning to get these elements right would be building your foundation and framework and then actively put time aside every quarter to review your progress.

Every new project you initiate in your business, from innovation and developing new products and services to on-boarding new employees, make sure the foundations are strong and the support network or framework is in place. Having to re-visit failed projects due to lack of planning and preparation can be incredibly expensive, demotivating, stressful and a complete time waster.

Unfortunately many business owners waste so much time running around in reactive mode putting out fires  all day, because the initial foundations and business framework are not in place or are incredibly weak. Having a fancy bathroom or walk-in cupboards can be great, but if the walls of the house are crumbling down, a stand-alone victorian bath can seem pretty useless.

Good time management is about doing the right thing first and making sure you don’t need to keep going back to patch up the errors.

27 Jul

Are you a slave to distraction?

I’m going to assume that losing the use of your mobile phone would be most people’s worst nightmare. Probably for some more than others, depending on how attached you are to it or how much you rely on it.
I liked to think that I wasn’t one of those people who was completely hypnotised by this little device, but alas after my mobile phone went on the blink I have had to come to terms with the fact that after only one day of not being able to use it, I am showing signs of withdrawal. The biggest issue for me, is not knowing. Losing the ability to receive information and be updated immediately.
So whilst developing nervous twitches in my eye and hand, I started thinking about all of the other “things” that distract us during our day. Things that shift our focus from what is important and prevent us from completing and achieving our goals.
 
I hear people complaining about not having enough time in their day or their week to get to important jobs and tasks. I wonder how much of their day is filled with unnecessary distraction, which very quietly steals precious time away from them?
So here is an experiment to work out your ratio. Productive working hours vs. wasted work hours:
1) At the end of your work week document 5 key tasks/jobs that you would like to complete every day for the upcoming week. Or select a goal, which needs to be completed in a week and then break the goal into smaller, manageable goals, which are then distributed into the week.
2) Plot these tasks into your weekly planner for the upcoming week. By completing this it gives you a head start and you don’t feel as though you are starting the week on the back foot.
3) When the week begins you will now have each day planned out for you. After each day, spend 5-10mins documenting your day.
  •  Did you achieve your 5 tasks/jobs for the day?
  •  If you didn’t, why not? What stopped you from achieving the tasks?
  • If you did achieve all 5, well done. Why did you achieve everything on your list?
  • Complete this after-action review everyday and see what the end result looks like.
  • Where and why did you win and where and why were you challenged?
  • What distracts you? Were the distractions people, your motivational levels or your environment?
4) If you had to eliminate or manage those distractions, what would your week look like? How productive could you be?
The other thing which also needs to be raised, is do we necessarily need to know what is going on in the world all the time? How debilitating can the distraction of information overload be on your business and personal life?
My new goal, don’t allow unnecessary distractions from taking over my precious time. How about you?
Need some assistance? Contact me. nicole@tikumu.co.nz for professional business coaching.